Global Attention and Awareness on Prostrate Cancer with Dr. David Samadi

Dr. David Samadi was born in 1964 in a Persian Jewish community in Iran. In 1979, the Iranian Revolution forced him and his brothers out of the country. They had to immigrate to Belgium when he was only 15 years old and his brother three years younger.

In Belgium, they had to start a life without their parents and this shaped their dedication and ambition to succeed regardless of the shortcomings that life had brought their way. From the onset, David Samadi also wanted to be a doctor, and so, his arrival to the U.S. in 1984 was the beginning of his journey to pursue his career. Dr. Samadi studied medicine and graduated with honors from Stony Brook School of Medicine. He, later on, worked on his postgraduate training in 1996 and became an oncology fellow at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center where he specialized in proctology.

In the last decade alone, Dr. Samadi has performed at least 7,000 prostate cancer surgeries and has almost 90 percent cancer-free, success rate. In his experience, a urologic oncologist’s first step to treating prostate cancer should always be staging the cancer. Once that is completed, the specialist should provide relevant treatment recommendations to the client. In his experience, Dr. David Samadi prefers surgery over radiation for a number of reasons. One, several studies have proven that patients who undergo surgery have a better recovery than those who choose radiation.

Secondly, patients who underwent radiation are twice likely to die of the disease as opposed to those who underwent surgery. In addition, it becomes harder to treat patients that had undergone radiation when there is a recurrence or when cancer spreads to other body areas close to the prostate gland. Recent findings have shown that radiation treatment increases the potential of developing secondary cancer cases, including bladder and rectal cancer. In this case, the patient has a 30 percent likelihood of survival, which is pretty bad for any risk worth taking.

He advises that patients diagnosed with prostate cancer should inquire about the experience of their surgeon. Some of the factors to look out for include the number of surgeries the surgeon has performed, the rate of cancer recurrence on all his surgeries and sexual functionality of the patient if the surgery involved removal of the prostate gland. Prostate cancer has been observed to be common in older men aged 65 and above.

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